Past Loan Exhibitions

2014
Fresh Take, Making Connections at Peabody Essex Museum

2013
Newport: The Glamour of Ornament
Celebrating The Preservation Society of Newport County 

2012
Celebrating Historic Hudson Valley at 60: Rockefeller Patronage in Sleepy Hollow Country

2011
Grandeur Preserved: Masterworks Presented by Historic Charleston Foundation

 2010 
Colonial to Modern: A Century of Collecting at Historic New England

 2009
The Fragile Art: Extraordinary Objects from The Corning Museum of Glass

2008
An Eye Toward Perfection: The Shaker Museum and Library


2007
Southern Perspective: A Sampling from the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts

2006
George Washington's Mount Vernon

2005
The New-York Historical Society Bicentennial: Celebrating Two Centuries of Collecting

2004
A Celebration of the American Wing, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

2003
American Dreams, American Visions: The Collections of Shelburne Museum

2002 
"The Best is Not Too Good For You": Colonial Williamsburg Celebrates 75 Years of Collecting

2001

Shells, Scrolls & Cabrioles: American Furniture from Winterthur

2000
Away Off Shore: From the Collection of the Nantucket Historical Association

1999
A Centennial Celebration: Collections from the New York State Historical Association

1998
Historic Deerfield: Collecting for a New England Village

1997

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum: Celebrating 100 Years

1996

My Favorite Chair

1995
Edgewater on the Hudson: The Drawing Room Collection of Richard Hampton Jenrette

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2013
Newport: The Glamour of Ornament
Celebrating The Preservation Society of Newport County

The Breakers

The Winter Antiques Show 2013 loan exhibition: Newport: the Glamour of Ornament was presented by The Preservation Society of Newport County which is Rhode Island’s largest cultural organization. The society preserves and protects the best of Newport County’s architectural heritage and its 11 historic properties and landscapes - seven of which are National Historic Landmarks - form a complete essay of American historical development from the Colonial era through the Gilded Age.  In keeping with its mission, the Society strives to offer its members and the public a comprehensive view of each property’s architecture, interiors, landscapes and social history.  The Society hosts more than 800,000 visits to its properties annually. The Preservation Society's properties include: The Breakers (1895), Marble House (1892), The Elms (1901), Rosecliff (1902), Chateau-sur-Mer (1852), Kingscote (1841), Isaac Bell House (1883), Hunter House (1748), and Chepstow (1861). 

Slab table. Attributed to John Goddard, Newport, ca.1755. 42 ¼ in. x 20 in. x 28 7/8 in. Mahogany and marble. Hunter House. 


Dr. William Hunter’s Spaniels. Gilbert Stuart, Newport, ca. 1770. 30 ¾ in. x 35 ¾ in. Oil on canvas. Hunter House.

 

Mrs. Elizabeth Drexel Lehr (later Lady Decies)Giovanni Boldini, Paris, 1905. 46 in. x 86 in. Oil on canvas. The Elms.


Centerpiece.  Paul Storr, England, 1822-1823. 43 in. Silver. Marble House.

 

Vases. John Bennett, England, ca. 1880.  Kingscote.   

 

Micro mosaic top table.  American and Italian, 19th century. 31 7/8 in. x 35 ¼ in.  Rosewood. Kingscote.

 

Caryatid. Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, American, 1913. 5 ½ in. x 5 ½ in. x 22 ¾ in. Bronze. The Breakers. 

 

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2012
Celebrating Historic Hudson Valley at 60:
Rockefeller Patronage in Sleepy Hollow Country

Historic Hudson Valley
Sunnyside with Picnickers by John Henry Hill (1839-1922).  New York, 1878.  Watercolor on paper. Historic Hudson Valley, gift in memory of Mrs. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., by her children.

The Winter Antiques Show's 2012 loan exhibition, Celebrating Historic Hudson Valley at 60: Rockefeller Patronage in Sleepy Hollow Country marks the 60th anniversary of John D. Rockefeller Jr.'s founding of Sleepy Hollow Restorations, now Historic Hudson Valley (HHV). The museum's mission is to celebrate the history, architecture, landscape, and material culture of the Hudson River Valley, advancing its importance and thereby ensuring its preservation. HHV owns and operates Philipsburg Manor, Van Cortlandt Manor, Washington Irving's Sunnyside, Montgomery Place, and the Union Church of Pocantico Hills. The fine and decorative arts objects chosen for the loan exhibition spoke to the museum's three-part collecting scope: the possessions of New York families who once owned these river estates, historical resources that provide context for the people of the past who lived and worked on these properties, and emblematic objects representing key events in Hudson Valley history.  The exhibition highlighted a multi-generational Rockefeller legacy of research-based collecting, preserving, and interpreting history.

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2011

Grandeur Preserved: Masterworks Presented by
Historic Charleston Foundation


Grandeur Preserved: Masterworks Presented by Historic Charleston Foundation highlighted  more than fifty objects in an unprecedented collaboration among Charleston’s leading cultural institutions as well as private collections. The exhibition was organized by Historic Charleston Foundation, established in 1947 as an educational non-profit dedicated to the preservation of buildings, landscapes and cultural resources in Charleston and its historic surroundings. Important objects from Historic Charleston Foundation’s two museum houses will be complemented with loans from The Charleston Museum, Drayton Hall, Gibbes Museum of Art/Carolina Art Association, and Middleton Place Foundation, and include many works that will be on view for the first time. 
 

Epergne, Francis Butty and Nicholas Dumee, London, England, 1771-72, Silver, 47,
Middleton Place Foundation.


 

Eliza Izard (Mrs. Thomas Pinckney, Jr.) and Colonel Thomas Pinckney, Jr., Edward Greene Malbone (American, 1777-1807), 1801, Watercolor on ivory, Gibbes Museum of Art/ Carolina Art Association. 
 

 
Macaroni, French, c. 1796. Gold, pearls, enamel, agate, carnelian; with watch made by Lepine of Paris. The Charleston Museum.

Embroidery, Probably Charleston, South Carolina, Early 19th century, Silk,
The Rivers Collection.


Screech Owl, George Edwards (English, 1694- 1773), Probably London, possibly Leydon, The Netherlands, c. 1733, Watercolor and ink on laid paper, Drayton Hall.

Double Chest, Charleston, c. 1770. Mahogany with mahogany veneer, cypress and mahogany secondary woods, Historic Charleston Foundation.

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2010
Colonial to Modern: A Century of Collecting at Historic New England

Historic New England, a museum of cultural history, has thirty-six historically and architecturally significant properties across the region. Its collections, which span four centuries and include more than 110,000 objects and more than a million archival items, are the most important in the nation for the study of New England life. The exhibition included eighteenth to twentieth century furniture, paintings by academic and provincial artists, ceramics made in New England and abroad, and personal accessories from diamond brooches to silk brocade shoes. The focus was great objects with great stories--such as the Quincy family's Boston-made Japanned high chest, a 1735-1745 tour d'force of furniture that comes from one of New England's most influential families and survived two fires.

High chest, with decoration possibly by Robert Davis or Stephen Whiting. 1735-45. Boston. Red maple, red oak, white pine. Gift of Edmund Quincy. 1972.51.

Shoes, by Jonathan Hose and Son. Circa 1770. London. Silk brocade. Gift of Miss Mary C. Wheelwright. 1919.140.

Diantha Atwood Gordon (1809-1895), attributed to A. Ellis (active circa 1830-1832). Circa 1832. Fairfield, Maine. Oil on panel with gilding. Gift of Bertram K. and Nina Fletcher Little. 1991.433.


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2009
The Fragile Art: Extraordinary Objects from The Corning Museum of Glass



The Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, New York, is home to the world’s most comprehensive collection of glass. The museum displayed more than 50 exceptional objects at the 55th annual Winter Antiques Show. The loan exhibition presented works spanning four continents, more than three millennia, and the full range of artistic ingenuity and technical innovation in glass. Internationally renowned Vignelli Associates created the loan exhibition installation for the Winter Antiques Show.


Amphoriskos (miniature amphora). Eastern Mediterranean or Italy, late third to second century B.C. Cane slices fused and shaped
by slumping and tooling.



Sugar Bowl and Cream Pitcher. U.S., New York, probably Redwood or Redford Glass Works, 1835–1850. Blown, applied; coins enclosed in stems. Each stem encloses a U.S. silver half dime. The coin in the creamer is dated 1829, and that in the sugar bowl is dated 1835. There is another 1829 coin in the hollow knop of the sugar bowl’s lid.


Bottiglia allegria (Happiness bottle). Italy, Murano, Vetri Decorativi Rag. Aureliano Toso, Dino Martens (Italian, 1894–1970), 1952. Blown zanfirico glass.


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2008
An Eye Toward Perfection:
The Shaker Museum and Library



Installation view of the 2008 Winter Antiques Show Loan Exhibition

The Shaker Museum and Library in Old Chatham, NY holds the most important collection of Shaker materials in the world. With more than half obtained directly from Shakers, the collection exhibits remarkable original finishes, superb quality, comprehensive scope, and impeccable provenance. The Museum's recent acquisition of the North Family property at Mount Lebanon Shaker Village united the collection with the site that was once the center of all Shaker life.

An Eye Toward Perfection included some of the best examples of objects that demonstrate Shaker principles of faith, community, industry, and design. Whether sacred or temporal, everything created by Shakers was done with the understanding that it reflected a commitment to earthly perfection. As a result of the Shakers' constant interaction between the physical and spiritual worlds, the standards for objects they created in this world were set by standards of the next. For more information, visit shakermuseumandlibrary.org.


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2007
Southern Perspective:
A Sampling from the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts



Installation view of the 2007 Winter Antiques Show Loan Exhibition

The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA) in Winston-Salem, North Carolina is home to the world’s most comprehensive collection of fine and decorative arts made in the American South before 1820. MESDA exhibited over fifty of its rare, historic objects at the 53rd annual Winter Antiques Show.

The loan exhibition featured works that represent the three areas of MESDA’s South: the Low Country, the Chesapeake region and the Backcountry. The Chesapeake area and the Low Country are situated on the southern coastline. Both areas prospered in early America by exporting cash crops, such as cotton and tobacco, leading to the creation of urban trade centers that emulated sophisticated notions of English style and design. Located inland, the Backcountry encompasses parts of present day Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and the Carolinas. Many of these settlers were Europeans who had escaped religious persecution and found a new home that became a potpourri of national cultures and ethnic styles.  For more information, visit the MESDA website at MESDA.org.

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2006
George Washington's Mount Vernon



Installation view of the 2006 Winter Antiques Show Loan Exhibition

George Washington's Mount Vernon Estate & Gardens is steeped in American history, with the richest and most comprehensive collection of George Washington-related artifacts and works of art in the world. Although primarily remembered for his contributions as general of the Continental Army and first president of the country, Washington was also a farmer, inventor, and architect. Mount Vernon's collection show Washington's awareness and interest in 18th century style and design and offers a glimpse into how the Washingtons lived over 200 years ago. The historic home of the nation's first president displayed dozens of significant treasures at the 52nd annual Winter Antiques Show.

Most of the objects included in the loan exhibition were not on display at Mount Vernon. In October 2006, these objects joined hundreds of others displayed in their new home at Mount Vernon, in the Ford Orientation Center and Donald W. Reynolds Museum & Education Center. The education complex is the major component of a campaign by George Washington's Mount Vernon Estate & Garden to create a state of the art facility that will help illuminate the life and legacy of the "Father of Our Country."  For public information visit Mountvernon.org.


2005
The New-York Historical Society Bicentennial: Celebrating Two Centuries of Collecting

The New-York Historical Society holds one of the world's foremost collections of historical artifacts, American art, and other materials documenting the history of the United States and New York. It is home to both one of the nation's most distinguished independent research libraries and New York City's oldest museum. Founded in 1804, its mission is to explore the richly layered history of New York City and State and the country, and serve as a national forum for the debate and examination of issues surrounding the making and meaning of history.

Highlights of the New-York Historical Society exhibition includedthe original watercolor rendering Great Blue Heron from John James Audubon’s famed Birds of America series; the armchair used by George Washington during his inauguration ceremony, and also in the ceremonies of presidents Ulysses S. Grant and James A. Garfield; a rare Tiffany Studios Cobweb lamp; and a selection of colonial and early American silver, including a teapot (ca. 1695) that may be the earliest extant example made in New York, and an elaborate presentation vase (1829) by noted Philadelphia silversmith Thomas Fletcher.

For more information, visit nyhistory.org.


Open storage at the New-York Historical Society

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2004
A Celebration of the American Wing,
The Metropolitan Museum of Art



At the 2004 Winter Antqiues Show, A Celebration of the American Wing, the Metropolitan Museum of Art showcased the Museum's vast collection with a selection of paintings and decorative arts objects from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Colonial period highlights included a fine portrait (1773) by John Singleton Copley, a beautifully carved Philadelphia Chippendale tea table (1765-75), and a magnificent basket (1770-76) by master silversmith Myer Myers. The nineteenth-century display included a Federal-period pier tea table (1815-19) by Charles-Honore Lannuier, a secretary desk (c. 1882) by the Herter Brothers, Augustus Saint-Gauden's bronze Diana (1894 or after), John Singer Sargent's Mr. and Mrs. I.N. Phelps Stokes (1897), and a selection of favrile glass vases by Louis Comfort Tiffany. This exhibition, which included many rarely loaned objects, suggested both the depth and breadth of the American Wing's collection.

Housed in the American Wing, the Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection of American art is the most comprehensive in the world, reflecting the Museum's long commitment to acquiring, exhibiting, and studying the nation's fine and decorative arts. More than 18,000 paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts are currently accessible to the public on four floors of the gallery and study areas. The period rooms and galleries survey American art from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. The American Wing has recently completed two phases of significant alteration, which reflect the Metropolitan's continual dedication to the acquistion, display, and interpretation of American art of the highest quality, breadth, and interest.

For more information, please visit metmuseum.org.


2003
American Dreams, American Visions:
The Collections of Shelburne Museum

Founded by Electra Havemeyer Webb, the Shelburne Museum has been described as "Vermont's Smithsonian." One of the earliest collectors of Americana and American folk art, Electra Havemeyer Webb opened the museum to the public in 1947. Aptly characterized as a "collection of collections," the museum houses one of America's most extensive collections of folk, fine, and decorative arts in 37 historic buildings and houses. The product of a lifetime of collecting by Mrs. Webb, the offerings include European Impressionist paintings displayed in Mrs. Webb's recreated Park Avenue residence, hundreds of duck decoys housed in an 1832 country home, and the 220-foot steam boat Ticonderoga, a National Historic Landmark.

American Dreams, American Visions: The Collections of Shelburne Museum showcased the eclectic mix of Shelburne's collection of more than 80,000 objects spanning three centuries, and demonstrated Webb's commitment to establishing one of the most impressive assortments of paintings, folk art, textiles, decorative arts, artifacts, and architecture. The Mary Cassatt pastel Louisine Havemeyer and Her Daughter Electra (1895), Grandma Moses' After the Wedding (1942), and the pair of portraits by William Prior of The Reverend John Lawson and Mrs. Lawson (1843), were joined by striking examples of weather vanes, trade signs, textiles, and decoys.

For more information, visit the Shelburne Museum website at Shelburnemuseum.org.


Mary Cassatt, Louisine Havemeyer and Her Daughter Electra

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2002
Shells, Scrolls & Cabrioles: American Furniture from Winterthur

The 2002 Winter Antiques Show loan exhibition came from the Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library, which celebrated its 50th anniversary that year. Located in Winterthur, Delaware, Wintherthur Museum is known worldwide for its preeminent collection of more than 85,000 American antiques. The special loan exhibition featured masterpieces from Henry Francis du Pont's comprehensive collections. Henry Francis du Pont was committed to establishing one of the most impressive assortments of ceramics, glass, textiles, silver, paintings, and prints made or used in America from 1640 to 1860. The loan exhibition included outstanding furntiure from Winterthur's extensive collection.

During the week of the Show, Winterthur also presented the Henry Francis du Pont Award for Decorative Arts and Architecture, which honors those who have contributed significantly to the understanding and enjoyment of America's heritage through collecting, studying, or promoting the American arts, particularly the decorative arts and historic architecture.

For more information, visit the Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library website at Winterthur.org.



2001
"The Best Is Not Too Good For You":
Colonial Williamsburg Celebrates 75 Years of Collecting



The 2001 Winter Antiques Show honored the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation with a special exhibition. The display featured some of the finest pieces from the Foundation's more than 60,000 objects, including furniture, paintings, folk art, scultpure, textiles and clothing accessories, prints and maps, ceramics, glassware, metalware, tools, and instruments.

Colonial Williamsburg, the nation's oldest and largest outdoor living history musuem, comprises the reconstructed 18th century capital of Virginia and also houses two world-class museums: The DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum and the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum. The Wallace Museum, supported by the DeWitt Wallace Fund for Colonial Williamsburg, displays the Foundation's exceptional collection of British and American decorative arts. The Folk Art Museum, which houses the late Mrs. Rockefeller's permanent collection of 484 objects and several changing exhibitions each year, is the first institution in the U.S. devoted exclusively to collecting, exhibiting, and researching American folk art. For more information, visit the Colonial Williamsburg website at Colonialwilliamsburg.org.

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2000
Away Off Shore: From the Collection of the Nantucket Historical Association



1999
A Centennial Celebration: Collections from the New York State Historical Association


1998
Historic Deerfield: Collecting for a New England Village


1997
Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum: Celebrating 100 Years


1996
My Favorite Chair

1995
Edgewater on the Hudson: Drawing Room Collection of Richard Hampton Jenrette